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Scrapers

If some of our other categories were large, then this one is huge!  At one time the mainstay of the turner's armoury, especially during the 'dark ages' of the turning craft between the thirties anPictured the seventies, these largely unsophisticated tools still perform a vital role in the finishing of a wide range of faceplate turning projects.

There are scrapers for bowls and scrapers for boxes; scrapers for platters and scrapers for shearing.  But you'll find there are no scrapers for spindles: that just isn't the way of it!  As a general guideline, we would suggest that you use the largest, heaviest, strongest scraper that will fit into/onto your workpiece.  That way lies stability and the freedom from ruinous vibration.

With such a wide range of scrapers on offer, you may find the following list helpful: clicking on the relevant title will take you straight to the chosen section of the lists.  If you simply want to familiarise yourself with what this range offers, then browse down this very long page.

Click on this icon  Click for photo to view an enlarged photo in a separate browser window.

HS 19 R/H Skew Scraper but also see HS37, HS28, 823H12, HS29, 823H34, HS30, 823H1, HS31, 823H114, HS14, HS19, HS20 HS14 Straight Scraper or square scraper, including HS37, HS28, 823H12, HS29, 823H34, HS30, 823H1, HS31, 823H114, HS14, HS19, HS20, 821H

(Left) For shapes like this, look in the
Straight Scrapers section.

Diamond Scraper

Diamond Point Scraper (Diag E)

Round Side Cutting Scraper such as 824H, HS35

Round Side Cutting Scraper (Diag F)

HS15 Full Round Scraper  Alternatives include HS26, 820H12, HS38, 820H34, HS27, 820H1, HS34, 820H114, HS160, HS15, HS16, 8004LH HS16 Domed Scraper

These are the shapes you'll find in the
Round Nose Scraper section

HS18 Curved Scraper.  Similar include:828H, 8008LH, 8007LH, HS17, HS18
8008LH Curved Scraper

Other curves, in this style, are the subject of the Curved Scraper section

Diamond Side Cutting Scraper (Diag G)

Diamond Side Cutting Scraper such as HS36, 825H, 829H

In addition to these, you can also find Scraper Systems, Ray Key designed scrapers and Richard Raffan designed scrapers.  For Shear Scrapers, you should look at the Special Tools page.

Round Nose Scrapers: If you're turning bowls, then you certainly need to be looking in this section.  For cleaning out the final ripples inside a bowl there is nothing to beat a well-sharpened heavy duty scraper - unless you can get a perfect finish off the gouge and I've only ever seen that in books.  The designs here vary a little between manufacturer and model.  In the lighter scrapers, up to 1-1/4", the Taylor designs have a fuller curve, approaching a half-round (see diagram A, above) whilst the Sorby are radiused but far from semi-circular in plan (see diagram B , above).  The heavy duty scrapers, or as Sorby term them "extra-heavy duty scrapers" show further disparities: the Taylor HS15 is a full semicircular profile (as diag. A); their HS16 is more correctly termed 'domed' which is also the shape of the Sorby 8004LH (diag. B).  Like many others of today's tools, the Taylor Heavy Duty versions owe their origins to Peter Child, a father of the turning renaissance.  Also check out the heavy duty bowl scrapers produced by Hamlet and Crown Tools .

 

Curved Scrapers:  These are similar to the tools shown in the preceding section, but with asymettric profiles.  The Sorby designs are two left hand curved tools, the 828H and the 8008LH as in diagram D, above and a right-handed version the 8007LH for outboard turning.  The Taylor designs are both from their heavy duty Peter Child Design series and are a left-hand (HS17) and a right-hand/outboard (HS18) style as shown in daiagram C, above.  Of this whole group, only the Sorby 828H is standard weight: all of the others are the very desirable Extra Heavy Duty weight.

In addition to these designs of curved scrapers, both the Ray Key and Richard Raffan sections include curved scrapers.  Also check out the heavy duty bowl scrapers produced by Hamlet and Crown Tools.

 

*NB: Prices quoted in pounds sterling.
Value Added Tax will be added to invoices to EU residents unless
a valid VAT registration number is quoted when ordering.

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Round Side Cutting Scrapers:   Diagram F, above, indicates the shape of these tools.  They are at their best when working in goblets, eggcups, chalices and similar vessels as well as in bowl turning.  The two examples here are standard weight tools made of 1/4" steel.  Given a bit of judicious re-grinding, it is possible to produce from one of these shapes, scrapers that can reach almost anywhere.

 

Straight-Edged Scrapers:  This large group includes both square scrapers and skew scrapers, the difference being that a square scraper is cut square across at 90 degrees to the tool axis (diagram J) whilst a skew scraper has its edge ground to make an angle of around 20 degrees to the tool axis (diagram K).  All of the standard weight models have straight across grinds but in the Heavy Duty table, all are skew ground except the Taylor HS14.  These tools are especially useful when finishing the surface of platters, trays and tabletops, but do need a degree of care in use to avoid leaving grooves behind.  In this respect the skew designs are easier to handle than the straight grinds.

 

The Taylor HS14 is ground square across.  All others are skew grinds.  The HS20 is left cutting. The HS19 is right cutting, as shown below.  These hefty Taylor models are all from the Peter Child Design Series.

HS19 R/H Skew Scraper Picture
 

*NB: Prices quoted in pounds sterling.
Value Added Tax will be added to invoices to EU residents unless
a valid VAT registration number is quoted when ordering.

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Diamond Side Cut Scrapers: as shown in diagram G, above are used primarily in box production and similar tasks.  829H Round/Side Cut Scraper.  Below are diamond point scrapers HS43, HS44, HS45

Normally these tools have a relief cut behind the side cutting edge to limit the amount of edge in contact with the lateral cut.  The Sorby 829H Click for photo is a new design made specifically for use in boxes and features a slightly rounded corner between the nose and the side edges.  There is also a 'Gold Collection' version of this tool with Sorby's titanium nitride coating for increased edge life between sharpenings.

 

Diamond Point Scrapers:   One of the few scraper designs which may be found in use in spindle turning.  However, even in that application, our advice would be to use a skew chisel to cut grooves instead.  This allows the choice of using the skew conventionally to cut clean grooves of a chosen vee angle, or with its side flat on the rest to scrape a fixed-angle groove with the side of the long point.

 

*NB: Prices quoted in pounds sterling.
Value Added Tax will be added to invoices to EU residents unless
a valid VAT registration number is quoted when ordering.

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Raffan Design Bowl Scrapers: Click for photo of types: HS64, HS65, HS66, HS67, HS83, HS158  Once again the genius and originality of Richard Raffan have given birth to a unique approach to woodturning situations which make the rest of us simply struggle to succeed.  In his curved bowl scrapers, Richard has designed tools which have the rigidity to avoid fluttering yet which are easy to handle.  There is a range of these tools of various cross-sections, as listed below.  The recommended method of use of these tools, which have an elliptically-curved cutting edge in plan, ground at around 45 degrees, is to move the tool from the rim of the bowl inwards towards the centre using very gentle pressure.  These commercially- produced examples are equivalent to the types A and A2 profiles shown in Richard Raffan's book, "Turning Wood with Richard Raffan", available through our book pages .  A book well worth reading.

The HS158 is from Henry Taylor's series of long tools and features a 24" (610mm) handle and 10" (254mm) blade.

 

Ray Key Design Scrapers: Click for photo including types HS103, HS104, HS108, HS109, HS110, HS111 Another icon of the turning world who has turned his creative thoughts towards more effective tools is Ray Key.  His various scraping tool designs are listed below and comprise: the HS103 Round Side Cutting Scraper; HS104 Square/End Side Cutting Scraper and the HS108 & HS109 French Curve Scrapers.  But unique among tools is the HS111 Shear Scraper with its novel, stubby, rhomboid profile and massive cross-section.  This tool is used at an angle of around 30 degrees from the toolrest and is especially effective at flattening platters and other flatware as well as the external shape of bowls.  A very fine finishing tool which will cope even with difficult timbers.  A fine set of tools from a fine turner.

For anyone wanting to learn more about using these tools, there was an excellent article by Ray Key himself on the subject in the magazine "Woodturning", Issue No. 56, October 1997.  (Published by The Guild of Master Craftsmen, UK).

 

Dovetail scraper HS163Dovetail Scraper:  Not too difficult to work out: this tool is specially designed to make accurate chucking recesses to accomodate the jaws of an expanding chuck.

 

Remember, if you need any further advice to find the best tool for your needs from this vast range, e-mail or telephone and we'll happily answer your queries and give our tool choice recommendations.  We're here to serve your needs.

*NB: Prices quoted in pounds sterling.
Value Added Tax will be added to invoices to EU residents unless
a valid VAT registration number is quoted when ordering.

Review Current Basket Contents 

1997-2009 P. Hemsley.  The information on this website is the copyright property of Peter Hemsley.  Coeur du Bois and The ToolPost are trading styles of Peter Hemsley.  Whilst reasonable efforts are made to ensure the accuracy of information presented, no liability can be accepted for errors in this information nor for contingencies arising therefrom.  If you are inexperienced in any aspect of woodworking, we would strongly counsel that you take a course of formal instruction before commencing to practice